Centre for Cell ImagingCCI

Below are a selection of images and videos from our facility. If you have data acquired at the facility and want to show them off, please get in touch with a member of the CCI staff.

Please do not reproduce these images without prior permission from the CCI.

User Contributions


Self-assembled mouse embryonic renal tissue

A developing kidney from an embryonic mouse can be dissociated into its constituent cells, then re-formed in the presence of other cells to study their incorporation and effect on development of the kidney. This single slice shows Six2 (cyan), Wt1-GFP (green), tubular structures (red) and podocytes in the glomeruli (magenta).

Images acquired on the Lightsheet. Experiment, acquisition and post-processing by Marie Held (Lévy Lab).

Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) of bacterial proteins

Using high-resolution AFM, the group of Luning Liu have studied, for the first time, the protein organisation, orientation and self-assembly dynamics of bacterial microcompartment shell facets.

Images taken on the 880 BioAFM. Read more here.

Daphnia development

This time-lapse video shows the embryonic development of Daphnia pulex. Creating time-lapse videos enables us to study the phenotypic changes that occur during Daphnia development.

Live assays allow us to gain an understanding of how development links to life history and how different developmental conditions can influence the variation we see in later life.

Images taken on the Epifluorescent microscope by Megan Hasoon (Plaistow Lab).

Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF)

TIRF microscopy only illuminates fluorophores within ˜100nm of the coverslip. The background from the cell body is removed, therefore excellent signal to noise is achieved. Here, DLC1-GFP is imaged in TIRF (green) and epifluorescence (red) mode and the channels merged. These images were captured using our BioAFM microscope by Jennifer Francis (Sée and Lévy Lab).

Polarised Light Microscopy

Polarised light microscopy is here used as a screening tool to characterise the solid form of pharmaceutical materials. Crystalline material is birefringent, which when viewed between crossed polarisers displays bright interference colours. Amorphous material is non-birefringent and appears dark against the background.

Images taken on the Epifluorescent microscope courtesy of Sarah Vernon (RedX Pharma).

Photothermal Imaging (LISNa)

Photothermal Imaging (AKA Laser-Induced Scattering around a NanoAbsorber) allows imaging of nanoparticles in better resolution than with light microscopy. Rama27 cells were incubated with gold nanoparticle-labelled FGF1 (Scale bar = 10 um). The magnified version shows the detection of single FGF1 proteins ("bright spots"), but also evidence for their diffusion ("streaks").

Image courtesy of Daniel Nieves (Lévy Lab).

Hypoxia Inducible Factors

Cells respond to low oxygen levels through the action of Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIFs). Here HIF-2α is shown to localise in nuclear 'speckles'.

Image courtesy of Sarah Taylor (Sée Lab).

Cells respond to low oxygen levels through the action of Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIFs). Here HIF-2α is shown to localise in nuclear 'speckles'.

Image courtesy of Sarah Taylor (Sée Lab).

HeLa cells expressing FUCCI probes

A montaged timecourse of a fibroblast cell line (HeLa cells) expressing the FUCCI probe. FUCCI cells changes colour based upon the cell cycle stage. These images were captured under hypoxia on our 710 Microscope.

Read more about FUCCI probes

Metabolic Markers in Spheroids

Spheroids are an excellent model system for studying the biology of tumours. Here cancer cells are labelled to study how glucose metabolism alters throughout the sphere.

Large spheroids like this and even small organisms can be imaged on our Lightsheet Microscope.

Transmitted light Imaging

Brightfield imaging relies on the scattering of light passing through the sample to identify areas of contrast. Several variants of this technique exist to enhance the contrast through interference (DIC:above) and modulation of light polarisation.

This sample is a section from a potato (Solanum tuberosum) imaged on the Epifluorescent microscope by Dave Mason (CCI). The starch granules are highly birefringent and so make an excellent standard for polarised light microscopy.

Neural development in Drosophila

Drosophila are regularly used in research to study the effect of genes on development. This dataset shows the effect of oncogenic cooperation between Ras and pico co-overexpression. Tumour cells are in green, activated JNK in red and glia in blue.

This z-stack was taken on the 710 Microscope by members of the Bennett Lab and post-processed by Dave Mason.

3D organoid cultures

These organoids are made of porcine intestinal epithelium, grown in 3D cultures. Differentiated epithelial cell types are demonstrated by staining for tight junctions (e-cadherin), goblet cells (mucin 2), enteroendocrine cells (chromogranin A) and epithelial polarisation (villin). The green colour shows the labelled marker, f-actin is labelled red and DNA is labelled in blue.

Imaged on the 880 Multiphoton microscope by Hayley Derricott (Coombes Lab).

Photothermal Imaging of erythrocytes

Photothermal imaging can be used to visualise metallic nanoparticles but is also useful for the label-free imaging of Red Blood Cells in tissue sections. Here, nine adjacent fields have been stitched together to image a 5μm-thick slice of liver.

Imaged on the PhotoThermal microscope and post-processed by Dave Mason. Sample courtesy of Lauren Scarfe (Murray Lab).

Quantitation of Wound Healing

The idea behind a wound healing assay is simple: grow cells to cover a surface, scratch a 'wound' into the cells then watch the wound 'heal' (either by cell replication, migration or a combination of both).

The rate of wound healing can be quantified post-acquisition, furthermore the wound area (green) and wound edges (red) can be visualised.

Experimental data courtesy of Daimark Bennett. Analysis and visualisation by Dave Mason.

Microinjection

There are many ways to introduce proteins, DNA or drugs into cells, few are as versatile as microinjection. At the CCI, you can microinject on the Epifluorescent Microscope.

Imaging live brain activity in Zebrafish

Day 1 casper zebrafish were imaged with our Light Sheet Microscope. The aim is to measure the activity in the brain during stimulation to understand what areas and even which neurons are involved in processing information.

Sample courtesy of Lynne Sneddon and Kieran Pounder. Image acquisition and movie courtesy of Marco Marcello.

Neuronal Co-Culture

This image shows living primary hippocampal neurons and astrocytes infected with lentiviruses expressing three different proteins tagged with Venus, Cyan, and Red Fluorescent Proteins.

Image taken on the 780 microscope, courtesy of Joanna Wardyn (Sanderson Lab).

Differential Interference Contrast Imaging

DIC imaging is a type of optical interferometry used to visualise differences in the optical path length. Using this technique, very finely detailed structures can be seen without the need for complicated sample preparation. In this DIC image of a HeLa cell, many structures are visible including filopodia, nucleoli, vesicles and cytoskeletal networks.

Image courtesy of Dave Mason.

Using high-resolution AFM, the group of Luning Liu have studied, for the first time, the protein organisation, orientation and self-assembly dynamics of bacterial microcompartment shell facets.

Images taken on the 880 BioAFM. Read more here.

TIRF microscopy only illuminates fluorophores within ˜100nm of the coverslip. The background from the cell body is removed, therefore excellent signal to noise is achieved. Here, DLC1-GFP is imaged in TIRF (green) and epifluorescence (red) mode and the channels merged. These images were captured using our BioAFM microscope by Jennifer Francis (Sée and Lévy Lab).

Polarised light microscopy is here used as a screening tool to characterise the solid form of pharmaceutical materials. Crystalline material is birefringent, which when viewed between crossed polarisers displays bright interference colours. Amorphous material is non-birefringent and appears dark against the background.

Images taken on the Epifluorescent microscope courtesy of Sarah Vernon (RedX Pharma).

Photothermal Imaging (AKA Laser-Induced Scattering around a NanoAbsorber) allows imaging of nanoparticles in better resolution than with light microscopy. Rama27 cells were incubated with gold nanoparticle-labelled FGF1 (Scale bar = 10 um). The magnified version shows the detection of single FGF1 proteins ("bright spots"), but also evidence for their diffusion ("streaks").

Image courtesy of Daniel Nieves (Lévy Lab).

A montaged timecourse of a fibroblast cell line (HeLa cells) expressing the FUCCI probe. FUCCI cells changes colour based upon the cell cycle stage. These images were captured under hypoxia on our 710 Microscope.

Read more about FUCCI probes

Spheroids are an excellent model system for studying the biology of tumours. Here cancer cells are labelled to study how glucose metabolism alters throughout the sphere.

Large spheroids like this and even small organisms can be imaged on our Lightsheet Microscope.

These organoids are made of porcine intestinal epithelium, grown in 3D cultures. Differentiated epithelial cell types are demonstrated by staining for tight junctions (e-cadherin), goblet cells (mucin 2), enteroendocrine cells (chromogranin A) and epithelial polarisation (villin). The green colour shows the labelled marker, f-actin is labelled red and DNA is labelled in blue.

Imaged on the 880 Multiphoton microscope by Hayley Derricott Coombes Lab).

These organoids are made of porcine intestinal epithelium, grown in 3D cultures. Differentiated epithelial cell types are demonstrated by staining for tight junctions (e-cadherin), goblet cells (mucin 2), enteroendocrine cells (chromogranin A) and epithelial polarisation (villin). The green colour shows the labelled marker, f-actin is labelled red and DNA is labelled in blue.

Imaged on the 880 Multiphoton microscope by Hayley Derricott Coombes Lab).

There are many ways to introduce proteins, DNA or drugs into cells, few are as versatile as microinjection. At the CCI, you can microinject on the Epifluorescent Microscope.

This image shows living primary hippocampal neurons and astrocytes infected with lentiviruses expressing three different proteins tagged with Venus, Cyan, and Red Fluorescent Proteins.

Image taken on the 780 microscope, courtesy of Joanna Wardyn (Sanderson Lab).

DIC imaging is a type of optical interferometry used to visualise differences in the optical path length. Using this technique, very finely detailed structures can be seen without the need for complicated sample preparation. In this DIC image of a HeLa cell, many structures are visible including filopodia, nucleoli, vesicles and cytoskeletal networks.

Image courtesy of Dave Mason.

A developing kidney from an embryonic mouse can be dissociated into its constituent cells, then re-formed after inclusion of other cells to study their incorporation and affect on devlopment of the kidney. This single slice shows Six2 (cyan), Wt1-GFP (green), tubular structures (red) and podocytes in the glomeruli (magenta).

Images acquired on the Lightsheet. Experiment, acquisition and post-processing by Marie Held (Lévy Lab).

Brightfield imaging (top left) relies on the scattering of light passing through the sample to identify areas of contrast. Several variants of this technique exist to enhance the contrast through interference (DIC:top right) and modulation of light polarisation (bottom left).

This sample is a section from a potato (Solanum tuberosum) imaged on the Epifluorescent microscope by Dave Mason (CCI). The starch granules are an excellent standard for polarised light microscopy.

Presentations & Talks


Dave Mason from the CCI gives an overview of the Fundamentals of Microscopy. The talk covers the basics of transmission and fluorescence microscopy, the lightpath of a widefield microscope and the formation of an image.

This talk was given as part of the 2017 CCI Imaging Workshop held on the 11th September 2017.


Using examples from facility users, Dave Mason presents imaging and microscopy to a visiting school group, on a journey through 5-dimensions

This talk was recorded on the 10th January 2017 when sixth formers from Shrewsbury School visited the Institute of Integrative Biology for the day.

University of Liverpool

© Liverpool Centre for Cell Imaging